David Morgan-Davies

Category: collaborative


Elsewhere is here : Anderswo ist hier is the first exhibition to come out of the artist exchange between artists from Hannover and Bristol; the background to which I’ve written about here. Whilst aiming to challenge the assumption that engagements with others needn’t grow evermore distant, the project aims for a playful yet critical reflection on current times. In response to the cultural and artistic exchange around place, proximity, self and other 10 artists from the two cities present new work at the Turba Gallery in Linden, Hannover.

Elsewhere is here : Anderswo ist hier
12 July – 12 August 2018

The Turba Gallery
Stephanus­straße 23
Hannover, Germany

Bristol Artists
Alec Stevens (Sculpter) – https://www.alecstevens.co.uk
Catherine Knight (Painter) – http://www.catherineknight.com
Robert Luzar (Site-specific performance) – http://www.robertluzar.com
Ruth Piper (Painter/Curator) – http://ruthpiper.com
David Morgan-Davies (lens-based) – http://davemd.co.uk

Hannover Artists
Based at the Turba Gallery in the Linden district of Hannover
Conrad Veit(Film/Video installation)
Jean Sikiaridis (Performance / installation)
Marlene Bart (Print-Graphic scientific illustration)
Sven-Julien Kanclerski (Physical structures/installation)
Rui Zhang (Painter)

I’m currently working with a group of artists from BV studios (Alec Stevens, Catherine KnightRobert Luzar and Ruth Piper) on an exciting artist exchange project with a group of artists from Hanover in Germany. The exchange marks the legacy of the 70th anniversary of the twinning between the cities of Bristol and Hannover. It was initiated by Alix Hughes, Bristol’s International Twinnings Officer and is supported by Bristol Hannover Council

The exchange will be the first of its kind during the 70 years of twinning between the two cities. In the current political climate we feel that now, more than ever, we need to celebrate the spirit of reconciliation; the links between the two cities and build connections for the future. During the course of 2018/19 the Bristol artists will make a trip to Hanover with the artists from Hanover making a reciprocal trip to Bristol. All artists involved will make new work to be exhibited at an exhibition in each city at the end of their respect visits.

Our working title for the project and both exhibitions is ‘Elsewhere is here : Anderswo is hier’, which will present a cultural and artistic exchange around place, proximity, self and other. The German “Anderswo is hier” and English “Elsewhere is here” act as loosely translated points of departure that respond to the European cultural legacy of Twinning – a programme encouraging certain cooperations and ongoing reconciliations between partner countries. This project focuses both on new and existing works (sculpture, performance, painting, photography and drawing) made in the artist’s home cities as well as work made during the artist exchange residencies. The works will engage with concepts and mediums such as landscape through photography and painting, space and identity using sculpture and installation, and events happening through performances and drawings made using internet streaming and video.

Watch this space..

Dave Morgan-Davies at the Grant Bradley Galery

new-clear vision
Giclee print on aluminium, 66cm x 102cm

bless the weather i, ii, iii
Floating acrylic Giclee prints, framed
28cm x 28cm

DMD’ 2013

 

F-Number showcases the work of photographers Alec Jackson, Charles Emerson, Dave Morgan-Davies, Emile Roberts, Nige’ Ollis, Marten Rostel, Michael Reeves, Milo Newman and Rachel Sokal.  All are engaged in the most creative applications of the medium. F-Number aims to show a diverse spectrum of work, from instant candid moments to detailed, intricately arranged compositions.

 

F-Number

9th – 30th March 2013

Private view – Friday 8th March at 6pm

The Grant Bradley Gallery
1 St Peters Court
Bedminster Parade
Bristol BS3 4AQ
0117 9637 673

icon.jpg  I spent some time this summer creating a mediascape for the Sweet History? project. The project run by the Architecture Centre in Bristol aims to make information about the heritage built environment of Bristol interesting and accessible to young people and lifelong learners. It explored the impact of the sugar and slave trade on the heritage built environment of Bristol, and enabled young people from the Archimedia group (Knowle West Media Centre) to create a host of digital media on the subject.

Using the young people’s audiovisual content as a starting point a website, a trail map and finally the mediascape have been built  introducing 23 landmark buildings and houses linked to 18th century Bristol and the triangular trades of sugar, slaves and tobacco.

For information and downloads visit www.sweethistory.org

tiger museum

October 17, 2008

art, collaborative

mexican tiger head.jpgMy friend artist Tony Eastman has been collecting tiger related memorabilia for many years.  He shares his passion for all things tiger with anyone interested in tigers; collecting; art or purely having a curious mind.  In the past he has shown his collection in his garden shed, complete with curator/guide in costume, but time was right to get with the 21st century.  A web site has now been built, of which I had some input (mainly photographing the collection). The site tigermuseum.com does a great job of showcasing the collection and sharing Tony’s magpie like approach to collecting and enthusiasm for life in general.

Brunel 200

November 13, 2006

collaborative

Brunel

To mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Isambard Kingdom Brunel funding was made available for various events to celebrate his life and work. Sculptor Tony Eastman and myself made a joint application to produce an artistic response to the hard engineering of Brunel’s work.

Through detailed research it became apparent that during Brunel’s lifetime equally important advances were being made though leaps in creativity in art, music and literature. With this in mind our focus shifted in the search for a medium that would allow us to express the achievements of Brunel and his peers in the fields of the arts as well as in industry and the sciences, and simultaneously create a unique series of contemporary artworks. The art works would deliver factual information in a visually exciting way and be seen as a celebration of Bristol’s industrial past and cultural present.

The solution was to combine contemporary images produced by Bristol artists with textual historical parallels or timelines, and to create four large banners covering specific date ranges and linked visually to Brunel’s work. The banners would work visually on an individual level but would be strengthened when displayed as a group. Our intention was for the banners to be viewed by the general public in a busy Harbourside location with strong links to the City’s industrial past, popular with tourists and locals alike. Unfortunately our bid was unsuccessful.

DMD August’2005